Betting Gaming And Lotteries Commissions Town Hall Meetings Underway

first_img Recommended for you Related Items:andral shirley, jamaica, lottery commission Bahamas DPM Turnquest, as IDB Governor, Talks Technology and Climate Change Resilience at IDB Conclave Jamaica’s Senate Begins debate on National Identification and Registration Bill Two boys die, bicycle and van collide in St. Catherine, Jamaica Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppMONTEGO BAY, Feb. 14(JIS): The Betting, Gaming, and Lotteries Commission (BGLC) has embarked on a series of town hall meetings, aimed at heightening public and stakeholder knowledge and awareness about new standards and regulations governing engagements for which the agency provides oversight. Five such meetings are scheduled, the first of which took place in Negril, Westmoreland, on February 12.Addressing participants, BGLC Executive Director, Andral ‘Jack’ Shirley, said the new standards and regulations introduced resulted from “certain” amendments made to the Betting, Gaming, and Lotteries Act, based on the need identified to update laws governing the local industry.This, he pointed out, to better position the industry to be consistent with international operational, regulatory, and monitoring standards, and best practices, which, he said, have evolved “greatly” upwards of the last 40 years.Additionally, he said, the amendments also aim to better enable Jamaica to tap into potential global opportunities for significant revenue inflows. The Executive Director advised that the relevant engagements being undertaken will commence with gaming lounges and, over time, be introduced in all other industry areas, including: horse racing and lotteries.“We are mandated to introduce into the gaming lounges, for a start, issues dealing with (the) Anti-Money Laundering Legislation. (This is) to ensure that we observe all the (relevant) guidelines, as Jamaica is a signatory to international treaties which enforces on us, the responsibility to ensure that our licensees stay within the rules, (by) ensuring no money-laundering activities are conducted in any of the enterprises that we (BGLC) regulate,” Mr. Shirley informed.Betting, Gaming, and Lotteries Commission…2He said by virtue of the information that will be disseminated through the town hall meetings,. “this will enable you to stay on top of your game and to work and observe the guidelines, to foster responsible gaming and to be compliant.”.The remaining meetings are slated to be held between February 16 and 21 in Manchester, Kingston, St. James, and St. Ann. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

JAMAICA Know your rights what to do if youre arrested

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Jamaica, November 8, 2017 – Kingston – Head of the Corporate Communications Unit of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), Superintendent Stephanie Lindsay, is encouraging Jamaicans to know their rights and the correct protocol for arrest under the law.Speaking with JIS News, Ms. Lindsay states that the police may carry out an arrest for different reasons, such as to prevent an offence, to prevent the continuation of an offence and to prevent escape.   She says that regardless of the circumstances leading to an arrest, the basic rights of the individual should be observed at all times during the process.“The police officer will carry out an arrest in three main ways… on view, which is when you detect an offence taking place… on information from a third party, that is, when someone comes to the police station and makes a report.   There is an investigation and (an) arrest is made based on the information provided.  We also conduct Arrest on Warrant,” Superintendent Lindsay explains.Under Section 15 of the Constabulary Force Act, it is lawful for any Constable, without warrant, to apprehend any person found committing any offence punishable upon indictment or summary conviction, and to take him before a Justice to enquire into the circumstance of the alleged offence.   The law also provides for the persons to be committed to the nearest jail, prison or lock-up to be dealt with, or to grant the person bail in accordance with the Bail Act.Ms. Lindsay states that in a normal arrest procedure, the officer identifies himself or herself to the individual and informs the person of the offence for which he or she is being arrested and charged. The officer then restrains and cautions the individual.An essential aspect of the arrest is the ‘caution’, which notifies the offender of his/her rights during the process, particularly the right to remain silent, as anything said will be taken down in writing and used as evidence in court.   Following the caution, the police should then escort the detainee to the station.   Here, it is determined whether the person is eligible to be granted bail at the station level, or is to be remanded in custody for the matter to be brought before a Magistrate to grant or deny the bail application.Ms. Lindsay also advises persons to carry proper identification (driver’s licence, passport, voter’s ID) when going to the station.“If you don’t have proper identification when you are taken to the police station, you can’t get bail (because) you cannot be properly identified.   So it is important that you have some kind of proper identification.   If you don’t have it on your person, then you will be required to ask someone to bring some form of identification,” she says.If, however, the person refuses or is unable to give the security (money or property) required as a condition for bail, it is lawful for the officer or sub-officer to detain the person in custody until such person can be brought before a Justice and dealt with in like manner, as is directed in the case of someone apprehended under the Act without warrant.   For persons with special needs, such as a medical condition, provision should be made, as these persons have a right to medical care.Other rights include the right to meals for the duration of confinement, as well as the right to a safe environment, to the extent that the person is to be protected from harm and injury while in police custody. This is particularly important in the case of persons with mental illness.“We have to ensure that they are separated from the other prisoners, so that they are not put in a situation where they are vulnerable or cause harm to the other detainees,” Ms. Lindsay states.Once at the police station, the remanded person is entitled to a phone call to notify someone of the arrest.Ms. Lindsay explains that more than one phone call is permissible to ensure that someone is notified of the person’s arrest and for the person to make arrangements for legal counsel and for the care of dependents.Where a minor is present at the point of arrest, the offender is allowed to call someone to take custody of the child. If there is no one, the police will then contact the Child Development Agency (CDA) to make arrangements for the child to be placed in State care until the person is granted bail, at which time they can retrieve the child.Meanwhile the Head of the Corporate Communications Unit says that arrested persons are also entitled to legal representation, and if a detainee cannot afford a lawyer, the government provides representation through the Legal Aid Council.“Once a person indicates that they cannot afford a lawyer, then the police will make contact with [an] attorney.   Usually, you will find that attorneys are assigned to different parts of the island.   The police will have a list of persons who are approved legal counsels … and you make arrangements for one of them to come in and represent the person who is being charged,” she explains.    Also, the person should be interviewed in the presence of his/her attorney so that there is legal guidance throughout the process.Additionally, where a child is in conflict with the law and has to be placed under arrest, the child should be told at the time of arrest in plain, simple, child-friendly language the reason for the detention.   Additionally, the child’s parents or guardians should be immediately notified by the police of the arrest and the reason for the arrest.The police are not permitted to question the child without legal representation.   The Office of the Children’s Advocate (OCA) or Duty Counsel on the Legal Aid List is to be immediately contacted by the police where a child suspect is arrested and does not have legal representation.   A child who is not charged within 24 hours of being arrested or detained, should be released into the care of the parents or guardians.As it relates to bail application, depending on the gravity and nature of the charge, the detainee is entitled to bail.   Bail can be granted at the station level for minor offences, or on the likelihood of the individual appearing before a court for a trial.Section 25 of the Act states that the officer or sub-officer in charge of the police station or lock-up shall grant bail to that person in accordance with the Bail Act, unless the person has been taken into custody on a charge of murder, treason or treason felony.The officer is charged with ensuring that the dignity of the detainee is maintained throughout the process (no draping or dragging of the individual).   As far as is practicable, handcuffs must be used on males and violent females.   Just as the police officer is guided by certain responsibilities in the arrest procedure, so too the individual that is being arrested must observe certain protocols.Ms. Lindsay advises persons to cooperate with the justice officials.“Once you are approached by the police and informed that you will be arrested, and you are notified of the offence, we want persons to cooperate with the police and not try to resist, because that could lead to an additional charge of resisting arrest.   Don’t fight the police, because that could lead to another charge of assaulting the police. So we advise persons to cooperate with the (arrest) process,” she advises.If during arrest an individual feels his/her rights have been violated, there are several avenues for redress.On the advice of their attorney, civil action can be taken against the police and the Government to prove that the individual’s rights were violated by the police officers acting on behalf of the State.Persons can also make a formal complaint and document the incident with the Police Complaints Department in the Inspectorate of the Constabulary Force. Complaints can also be lodged with the Independent Commission of Investigations (INDECOM).Persons can also contact the Independent Jamaica Council for Human Rights, Jamaicans for Justice or the Office of the Public Defender for redress.By: Rochelle Williams (JIS) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Family members arrested for LA celebrity home burglaries

first_imgTwo of the suspects` pictures on display at a LAPD press conference to announce the arrest of four suspects in connection to a spate of high profile burglaries at the homes of singers, sportsmen and other celebrities in Los Angeles, California, 2 October 2018. Photo: AFPFour people have been arrested for allegedly burglarising the homes of celebrities including singer Rihanna and baseball star Yasiel Puig, Los Angeles police announced Tuesday.Authorities said they believe the suspects are part of a larger ring that specialises in breaking into the homes of athletes, actors and Hollywood film producers for theft.The home of basketball star LeBron James appeared on a list of dwelling that was seized by police and appeared to name future targets for robbery.The homes of actors Viola Davis and Matt Damon were also on the list.The suspects are three teens, two aged 19 and one 18, and the 34-year-old mother of one of them.”During recent months, the Los Angeles police department has become aware of a series of residential burglaries targeting actors, producers, musicians and professional athletes living in the Los Angeles area,” Lillian Carranza, head of the LAPD commercial crimes division, told a news conference.”The victims’ homes had been selected based on social media postings and touring or travel schedules of the owners. The burglars believed no one would be home and that the homes would contain sought-after valuables that they might be interested in,” she added.Police who made the arrests seized purses and wallets, watches, jewelry and a gun.Over the past two years the homes of celebrities such as Alanis Morissette, Nicki Minaj and Emmy Rossum have also been burglarised.last_img