If mom takes acetaminophen during pregnancy, does it affect her child’s behavior?

first_img Stergiakouli agreed. “Pregnant women should still use acetaminophen as required because there is a risk of not treating fever or pain during pregnancy,” she said.The verdict:The new study falls far short of showing that taking acetaminophen during pregnancy increases children’s risk of behavioral problems. @sxbegle Related: Pregnant women don’t need prenatal multivitamins, study concludes The size of the study and the care the researchers took to control for things such as maternal smoking and drinking — and even genetic factors — is impressive, said Dr. Yona Amitai of Israel’s Bar-Ilan University, an expert in pediatrics and toxicology who was not involved in the study, calling it “well conducted.” And the calculations seem solid.But the study matters only if the association between mom’s taking acetaminophen during pregnancy and her child’s behavioral problems is causal and not a coincidence — which is always a possibility in observational studies.There are reasons to doubt that children’s behavioral problems were caused by exposure to acetaminophen before birth. For one thing, for 6 of the 12 behavioral measurements (conduct problems, hyperactivity, and the like), statistical analysis showed it was quite possible the risk went the other way: that is, that mom’s acetaminophen use decreased the chances of the child’s having these problems.Of greater concern is what are called confounding factors, said Amitai. That means that although the researchers measured an association between kids’ behavioral problems and moms’ acetaminophen use, something else might also have been in play. The study did control for mothers’ smoking, drinking, age, self-reported psychiatric illnesses, ADHD genes, pain or fever (reasons for taking acetaminophen), and socioeconomic status. But “women who took acetaminophen during pregnancy might also be different from those who did not,” Amitai said. Do antidepressants during pregnancy increase baby’s autism risk? Gut CheckIf mom takes acetaminophen during pregnancy, does it affect her child’s behavior? Tags acetaminophenpediatricspregnancy The study did not control for some of the most significant influences on prenatal brain development and childhood behavior: mothers’ fish consumption during pregnancy (which ALSPAC and other studies have shown reduces the risk of hyperactivity and other behavioral problems, while promoting brain development) and their IQ and education. It’s therefore possible that the actual cause of the ALSPAC children’s behavioral problems was, for instance, their mothers’ low fish consumption or low education levels.As always with a study that asks people to remember what they did in the past (did you take acetaminophen?), fallible memories can also produce misleading results. And there were no data on how much acetaminophen mothers-to-be took, or how often, and therefore no way to check whether more was associated with worse problems for their kids — which, if true, adds to an association’s credibility.Stergiakouli told STAT that she and her colleagues dealt with potential confounding factors by measuring acetaminophen use by women after they gave birth. Their study “is robust to these confounding factors,” she said, and was conducted by top-notch epidemiologists who “specialize in examining if observational associations are causal.”Experts at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists said the study fell short of showing a convincing association between acetaminophen and behavioral problems in children. ACOG has “always identified acetaminophen as one of the only safe pain relievers for women during pregnancy,” said CEO Dr. Hal Lawrence. The new study presents “no clear evidence [of] a direct relationship between the prudent use of acetaminophen during any trimester and developmental issues in children.” Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. By Sharon Begley Aug. 15, 2016 Reprintscenter_img Sharon Begley Children whose mothers took acetaminophen by the 18th week of pregnancy were 16 percent more likely to have behavioral difficulties at age 7, epidemiologist Evie Stergiakouli of England’s University of Bristol and her colleagues reported. Children whose mothers took acetaminophen by their 32nd week were 46 percent more likely to have such difficulties.Really?It’s always important to know the absolute risk, since something like “a 46 percent greater risk of behavioral difficulties” sounds alarming. In this case, those numbers are more modest. Among 7-year-olds whose mothers took acetaminophen during their second or third trimester, 6.3 percent had overall behavioral difficulties, while 4.3 percent of those whose mothers did not take the drug had such problems. Some of the components of those difficulties: 12.3 percent vs. 8.8 percent for conduct problems, and 7.1 percent vs. 6.5 percent for problems with peer relationships.advertisement Related: About the Author Reprints Is too much folic acid during pregnancy a contributor to autism? APStock [email protected] Related: Gut Check looks at health claims made by studies, newsmakers, or conventional wisdom. We ask: Should you believe this?The Claim:Acetaminophen, sold as Tylenol and many generic formulations, is widely considered safe to take during pregnancy. But a new study reports that children of women who do so have a higher risk of behavioral problems when they’re about 7 than do children whose pregnant mothers never took the pain drug.Tell me more:This is a pretty straightforward observational study, published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers mined data collected by the long-running ALSPAC study in England, which in 1991 began recruiting pregnant women and has gathered years of data (via clinic visits and questionnaires) on their children’s health. There were 7,796 mother-child pairs in this study.Among the information collected: Did the women take acetaminophen while pregnant? By their fourth month, 53 percent reported doing so at any point in the previous three months; by their seventh month, 42 percent did. When the children were 7, their mothers answered a questionnaire about their children’s behavior, including conduct problems, peer relationships, emotional difficulties, and hyperactivity.advertisementlast_img read more

In interview, Biden outlines a lifelong role in cancer research, but not in a Clinton White House

first_img “I’m going to stay involved in this effort as long as I’m alive. So I’m going to stay engaged. Exactly how, I don’t know yet.” Biden said he is still exploring ways in which he might help accelerate cancer research once he and President Obama leave office. His commitment is borne out of personal loss: His son Beau died of brain cancer last year. HOUSTON — Vice President Joe Biden says he plans to dedicate his career after politics to cancer research — and to do so for “as long as I’m alive” — but ruled out serving in Hillary Clinton’s administration should she win the White House this fall.In a wide-ranging interview with STAT, Biden said he would want to work closely with a Clinton administration to build on the “cancer moonshot” he launched earlier this year and to help “coordinate” the initiative. But he dismissed the possibility that Clinton’s recent appeal for him to continue working on the effort meant he would serve in government.“I’m not going to stay on in the administration,” Biden said in a 25-minute interview here at Rice University, where he delivered a speech on Friday. “What Hillary talked about is, as I understood it, me being able to have the same authority over elements of her administration from the outside that I have now from the inside, to be able to coordinate those efforts.”advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: Please enter a valid email address. “An awful lot of the guys and women I met sort of walk by the mirror and go: ‘Nobel Prize,’” Biden said. “You don’t usually win the Nobel Prize in their minds by sharing.”Major research institutions and drug companies have committed to sharing some of their work as part of the moonshot. As he has previously, Biden credited that progress not to his own ability to accelerate research — “there’s nothing indispensible about me,” he said — but to an ability to “gather people up and … help break down barriers.”“I’m not saying all of a sudden there’s this selflessness that’s occurred,” Biden told STAT. “But the medical culture I think was a little embarrassed, at least in my view, because I don’t think they realized how different their culture was than other sciences.”“There’s a lot less pushback now on me,” he said. “Maybe it’s because they think I’m going to go away. Maybe they think this is just a phase of the moon. I don’t know. But I don’t think so. I’ve just got a feeling.” Transcript: Joe Biden on Hillary Clinton’s medical records and the future of the ‘moonshot’ He said he has discussed his next steps with scientists, foundations, and other institutions, and he recalled a recent conversation with “a billionaire philanthropist” — whom his aides declined to identify — about how he might work with “existing philanthropic efforts relating to cancer.”advertisement Biden threatens funding cuts for researchers who fail to report clinical trial results STAT/Getty Images Vice President Joe Biden Previously, Biden has spoken with Napster founder Sean Parker and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, among others, about the moonshot.“I’m going to stay involved in this effort as long as I’m alive,” Biden said. “So I’m going to stay engaged. Exactly how, I don’t know yet.”Should Donald Trump win the White House, Biden said he hoped it wouldn’t spell the end of his initiative. He pointed to Republican support in Congress as reason to be optimistic.“I would hope [Trump] would bring, attract, out of just pure patriotic necessity, some very good minds to let him know that there is a lot of money we’re spending in the federal government, billions of dollars on medical research,” Biden said, “and there is a consensus.”He contrasted supportive Republicans with the archconservative Freedom Caucus, which is frequently skeptical of federal spending. He said he hoped Trump would not fall in the latter camp.“I don’t think he’s that crazy,” Biden said. “We can afford all this.”The Obama administration has requested $755 million to fund the cancer research initiative in the next fiscal year — with significant money going to the National Institutes of Health and other US agencies. It has set a goal of achieving 10 years’ worth of progress in cancer research over the next five years. Related: The secretive system for vetting cancer drug use needs an urgent overhaul Four days later, editor in chief Jeffrey Drazen issued a letter clarifying his position and saying that researchers who use others’ data “can substantially improve human health.”“He got the living crap kicked out of him. I didn’t say a word. I never met the guy,” Biden said. “It was all some mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa. I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I’m hardly sorry.”In the interview, Biden also responded to concerns that he and his aides initially overlooked the importance of prevention efforts in the battle against cancer.While public health crusades, like anti-smoking and anti-obesity campaigns, are important to preventing cancer, he said, his initiative was focused on improving research to better understand genetic factors that predispose people to the disease — so they can seek treatment earlier.“There are still going to be people … who are going to get cancer,” he said, “that have nothing to do with the fact that they’ve ever smoked or been exposed to smoking, that have nothing to do with the environmental impacts.”Asked whether he has seen the “moonshot” change the culture of medical science, Biden said researchers have agreed to collaborate in ways he did not expect. But he described in frank terms the problem he was trying to solve — the “cancer politics” that he often references in his speeches. ExclusiveIn interview, Biden outlines a lifelong role in cancer research, but not in a Clinton White House Related: Newsletters Sign up for Cancer Briefing A weekly look at the latest in cancer research, treatment, and patient care. Privacy Policy Related: By Dylan Scott Sept. 19, 2016 Reprints Biden said he is hopeful that the GOP-controlled Congress will approve additional funding for the moonshot this year.The vice president has convened numerous high-level meetings among cancer experts and sought to encourage collaboration among researchers. The initiative has started to produce specific policy changes, such as new rules for clinical trials announced last week.But Biden’s efforts have not been immune to both skepticism and outright criticism.In January, the editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, along with a deputy, published an editorial labeling as “parasites” scientists who try to use one another’s research data to advance their own work. The editorial — which did not mention Biden directly, but followed his plea for data sharing as part of the moonshot — provoked a sharp backlash. Tags cancerJoe Bidenmoonshotpolicylast_img read more

Mosquitoes — and diseases like Zika — flourish when economies tank

first_img Pools left unattended are a prime breeding ground for the mosquitoes that transmit Zika and other diseases. Joe Raedle/Getty Images Of course, slumping economies and empty pools aren’t the only factors favoring Zika. Funding still plays the most critical role in the fight against diseases of public health significance. The US government’s slow movement on Zika-specific funding likely hindered progress in the early fight against the disease in Puerto Rico, and with the economy in collapse, local funds have been strained.Not all outbreaks, of course, happen in economic downturns. The 2014 appearance in Florida of chikungunya, another infectious disease carried by mosquitoes, and the recent discovery of more areas of Miami with Zika-infected mosquitoes both occurred during a rebound in the housing market, which presumably included better-attended, cleaner pools.It’s hard to predict the pattern of transmission for infectious diseases. But we do know the conditions that help them spread. Economic downturns consistently signal changes in human activity and patterns — the abandonment of construction sites when the market slows down, an increase in homeless encampments near mosquito breeding sites, increases in migration, and more. These, in turn, can affect the transmission of infectious diseases not only because of cuts in public health funding but because of changing economic conditions which affect on-the-ground transmission of diseases. Related: Tags malariapublic healthZika Virus @tweetMCN By Amy K. Liebman Oct. 28, 2016 Reprints Amy K. Liebman What the world has learned about Zika — and what it still needs to know A further threat comes from climate change, which is lengthening the mosquito season and expanding breeding grounds for mosquitoes. Climate change’s new ecological patterns require us to double down on our efforts to more quickly respond to the inevitable economic shifts.While we can’t always anticipate how an economic slump will fuel infectious disease, we should ensure that we have robust health planning in place. Our lack of foresight is most obvious in that we seem to have ceased considering public health needs as ongoing, long-term, inevitable, and constantly shifting. In the US, we don’t have enough resources to be reactive, let alone proactive.In addition to improving our responses to public health emergencies, we must provide long-term funding to let public health authorities take into account the changing nature of human behavior in response to economic changes. The health of all of us depend on it.Amy K. Liebman is the director of environmental and occupational health for the Migrant Clinicians Network, a nonprofit organization based in Austin, Texas.center_img Related: Such public health threats aren’t restricted to less developed nations. It happened in Florida during the Great Recession. Beginning in late 2007, hundreds of thousands of Floridians went into foreclosure after the subprime mortgage crisis, leaving thousands of stagnant abandoned backyard pools — perfect breeding grounds for mosquitoes. In 2009, the Sunshine State saw a severe and surprising spike in cases of dengue, which went hand-in-hand with the housing crisis.Roughly 100,000 people have left Puerto Rico in the last year, many of them abandoning their homes. A University of California, Berkeley, professor has compared this shift to the Dust Bowl migrations of the 1930s. The island is losing roughly a doctor a day, straining the health care system. These shifts have helped the Zika virus gain a stronghold in Puerto Rico.advertisement About the Author Reprints First OpinionMosquitoes — and diseases like Zika — flourish when economies tank [email protected] Puerto Rico is being pummeled by Zika, with hundreds of cases of birth defects feared The news out of Puerto Rico is grim: Not only has the Zika virus infected nearly 25,000 people so far, including almost 1,700 pregnant women, but the US government has appointed a Financial Control Board to oversee the territory’s government spending as it tries to cope with a nosediving economy and crippling debt. With few job prospects, Puerto Ricans are leaving the island in droves, often abandoning their homes. A failing economy, empty homes, and the outbreak of Zika: The three are related.Serious public health challenges often flourish in struggling economies because the habits and movements of people change. Yet health authorities rarely treat migration as a marker of public health concern.Take, for example, Venezuela, where the travels of wildcatting gold miners has resulted in a resurgence of malaria after the country had been malaria-free for more than half a century. Urban Venezuelans — computer technicians, civil servants, and the like who had fallen on hard times due to inflation and a crashing economy — set off for the edge of the rainforest to pan for gold in massive muddy gold mines abandoned by the government. Mosquitoes that still harbor the malaria parasite breed in the stagnant water around the squatters’ camps, biting and infecting the miners. With the collapse of the Venezuelan economy, drugs for preventing and treating malaria are scarce. And as malaria-stricken wildcatters head home, they are spreading the disease, beaten down a generation ago, in major cities.advertisementlast_img read more

Startup Spotlight: Want to sell your DNA? Genos is here to help

first_img By Sharon Begley Dec. 15, 2016 Reprints Tags biotechnologyfinancegeneticsresearchSTAT+ What is it? @sxbegle GET STARTED Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Business What’s included?center_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Startup Spotlight: Want to sell your DNA? Genos is here to help Sharon Begley Genos CEO and co-founder Mark Blumling Genos Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] Information may “want to be free,” as hackers proclaimed in the 1980s, but for anyone who thinks their genetic information is worth more than $0, there is now a middleman.Genos, a start-up spun out of Complete Genomics, on Thursday unveiled a crowd-sourcing platform where consumers can have their exome sequenced for $499 — and then connect to researchers who’ll pay them up to a couple hundred dollars to use that genetic data in studies. (The exome contains the DNA that codes for the production of proteins, and although it amounts to just 1 percent of the genome, it harbors more than 85 percent of the known variants linked to diseases.) Log In | Learn More last_img read more

Another channel for pharma lobbying: political groups with no dollar limits

first_img Log In | Learn More What’s included? WASHINGTON — Last year PhRMA announced plans to save its political spending for lobbying against federal efforts to fight rising drug prices. But the pharmaceutical industry group found giving to political groups known as 527s a good way to channel money to political party operations in the states.Federal election reports filed for the end of 2016 show that PhRMA gave more than $1.77 million to Republican groups, including GOPAC, which supports both federal and state candidates. PhRMA donated slightly over $1 million to Democratic groups. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags Congressinsurancepharmaceuticalspolicy Another channel for pharma lobbying: political groups with no dollar limits What is it? Alex Hogan/STAT GET STARTED Politics Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED By Sheila Kaplan Feb. 1, 2017 Reprintslast_img read more

Drug makers continue to face more securities fraud lawsuits

first_img Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. About the Author Reprints Drug makers continue to face more securities fraud lawsuits Ed Silverman STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @Pharmalot What’s included? Shareholders regularly file lawsuits seeking class-action status against companies alleging securities fraud. But the life sciences industry continues to attract more than others, according to a new analysis.Last year, there were 67 such lawsuits filed against drug makers and biotechs, along with their directors, officers, and key personnel. This amounted to a whopping 71 percent increase from 2015 and was also substantially higher than at any time in the past five years, according to the Dechert law firm, which conducted the analysis.center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Ed Silverman March 2, 2017 Reprints Log In | Learn More APStock [email protected] Pharmalot What is it? Tags LitigationpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

Women in 30s now having more babies than younger moms in US

first_img About the Author Reprints By Associated Press May 17, 2017 Reprints HealthWomen in 30s now having more babies than younger moms in US Tags fertility NEW YORK — For the first time, women in their early 30s are having more babies than younger moms in the United States.Health experts say the shift is due to more women waiting longer to have children and the ongoing drop in the teen birth rate.For more than three decades, women in their late 20s had the highest birth rates, but that changed last year, according to preliminary data released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.advertisement Andrew Shurtleff/AP Meanwhile, more teens are growing up with fewer of their peers getting pregnant, he said.“We always talk about peer pressure as a negative, but it can be a force for good,” Albert said.A separate CDC report focusing on deaths found the nation’s overall death rate fell last year after an unusual and worrisome increase in 2015.The reports are based on a first look at birth and death certificates filed across the country last year.Among the findings:— The overall birth rate was down slightly in 2016, to 62 births per 100,000 women ages 15 to 44.— The average age when women have their first child is about 28.— The teen birth rate continued to drop last year.—The infant mortality rate stayed about the same.—The overall death rate fell to about 724 per 100,000 people in 2016, down from 733 the year before.Experts said the 2015 increase was tied to an unexpected leveling off in the death rate from the nation’s leading killer, heart disease.Heart disease and stroke deaths were falling steadily until 2011, but then the annual decreases shrank. In 2015, the heart disease death rate increased nearly 1 percent, and started to go down again in 2016.Now it seems like 2015 may have been blip, “but we can’t tell right now what will happen next year or in the next couple of years,” said Dr. Stephen Sidney, a researcher at Kaiser Permanente Northern California who has written on heart disease death trends.— Mike Stobbe Associated Press The birth rate for women ages 30 to 34 was about 103 per 100,000; the rate for women ages 25 to 29 was 102 per 100,000. The CDC did not release the actual numbers of deliveries for each age group.It’s becoming more common to see older parents with kids in elementary or high school, said Bill Albert of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.advertisementlast_img read more

Tiger Woods told officers during arrest he had taken Xanax

first_img Behind Tiger Woods’s arrest and pain meds lies a problematic surgery HealthTiger Woods told officers during arrest he had taken Xanax Tiger Woods, arrested under suspicion of driving under the influence in May, told officers he had taken Xanax. Among the medications listed on the affidavit was Vicodin, an opioid pain medication. The FDA warns on its website that mixing Xanax with opioids may cause “profound sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death.” Related: JUPITER, Fla.  — Tiger Woods told officers during his DUI arrest last month that he had taken Xanax, as well as other prescription medications.Woods’ claim was revealed in an unredacted version of the Jupiter Police Department’s investigation report, obtained Friday by The Golf Channel.Woods, the 14-time major champion who had back surgery in April, was found asleep at the wheel of his Mercedes around 2 a.m. on May 29 and arrested on a DUI charge. A breath test registered 0.0 for alcohol, corroborating Woods’ claim that he had an “unexpected reaction” to prescription medicine.advertisement By Associated Press June 10, 2017 Reprints Woods told officers at a testing facility that he had taken several prescriptions, and the arrest affidavit listed four medications, but not Xanax.In the unredacted portion of the investigation report, officer Christopher Fandry described interrogating Woods at the scene. It was then that Woods said he had taken Xanax, an anti-anxiety drug.advertisement Tags opioidspharmaceuticals Associated Press About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

Dueling data: Amgen fires back over cost effectiveness for its cholesterol drug

first_imgPharmalot On the defensive about the value of its pricey cholesterol medicine, Amgen (AMGN) released a new study that argues its treatment is cost effective at about $9,700 a year, which is closely in line with the existing price tag — after discounts and rebates are subtracted from the $14,000 list price.This contrasts, however, with the $4,200 price point that a group of academics suggested in their own analysis, which was released earlier this week. In their view, the drug — an injectable medicine known as Repatha — should be marked down by roughly two-thirds off the list price to be seen as a good value. Their analysis was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED By Ed Silverman Aug. 23, 2017 Reprints What’s included? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. GET STARTED What is it? Robert Dawson/Amgen via AP Log In | Learn More center_img @Pharmalot Dueling data: Amgen fires back over cost effectiveness for its cholesterol drug Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] About the Author Reprints Ed Silverman STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags drug pricingpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

The investor euphoria for Incyte’s experimental cancer drug is hard to rationalize

first_img What’s included? Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. What is it? How bullish are health care investors about the future success of Incyte’s (INCY) IDO inhibitor epacadostat? Depending on who you ask, the cancer immunotherapy accounts for $10 billion to $12 billion of Incyte’s current $27 billion market value. That’s a huge bet on a single drug not yet approved.If epacadostat were a stand-alone company, it would be worth the same as Kite Pharma (KITE), which is being acquired by Gilead Sciences (GILD) for just under $12 billion. Investors value the drug more than Jazz Pharmaceuticals (JAZZ), Seattle Genetics (SGEN), and Exelixis (EXEL), all of which have approved, successfully marketed products. Adam Feuerstein Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints Adam’s Take GET STARTED Log In | Learn More By Adam Feuerstein Sept. 11, 2017 Reprints The investor euphoria for Incyte’s experimental cancer drug is hard to rationalize @adamfeuerstein Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED [email protected] Tags biotechcancercancer immunotherapydrug developmentSTAT+ STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.last_img read more