Startup Spotlight: Want to sell your DNA? Genos is here to help

first_img By Sharon Begley Dec. 15, 2016 Reprints Tags biotechnologyfinancegeneticsresearchSTAT+ What is it? @sxbegle GET STARTED Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Business What’s included?center_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Startup Spotlight: Want to sell your DNA? Genos is here to help Sharon Begley Genos CEO and co-founder Mark Blumling Genos Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] Information may “want to be free,” as hackers proclaimed in the 1980s, but for anyone who thinks their genetic information is worth more than $0, there is now a middleman.Genos, a start-up spun out of Complete Genomics, on Thursday unveiled a crowd-sourcing platform where consumers can have their exome sequenced for $499 — and then connect to researchers who’ll pay them up to a couple hundred dollars to use that genetic data in studies. (The exome contains the DNA that codes for the production of proteins, and although it amounts to just 1 percent of the genome, it harbors more than 85 percent of the known variants linked to diseases.) Log In | Learn More last_img read more